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Americans Now Have an Obesity Bill of Rights

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Spearheaded by the National Consumers League and National Council on Aging, the Obesity Bill of Rights Results from a Yearlong Factfinding Effort Involving Experts and Communities; Goal is to Define Quality Obesity Care as the Right of All Adults and Drive Systems Change

As Obesity Rates Climb Across the Nation, Leading Consumer, Aging, and Public Health Groups Unite to Release the First Obesity Bill of Rights for Americans and Unveil Plans to Transform Obesity Care Throughout the Health System Through Changes in Federal, State, and Employer Policies

ARLINGTON, Va., Jan. 31, 2024 /PRNewswire/ — Because obesity – the most prevalent and costly chronic disease in the United States – remains largely undiagnosed and untreated a decade after the American Medical Association (AMA) classified it as a serious disease requiring comprehensive care,1 the National Consumers League (NCL) and National Council on Aging (NCOA) today introduced the nation’s first Obesity Bill of Rights and launched a grassroots movement – Right2ObesityCare – to advance changes in federal, state, and employer policies that will ensure these rights are incorporated into medical practice.

Developed in consultation with leading obesity specialists and endorsed by nearly 40 national obesity and chronic disease organizations, the Obesity Bill of Rights establishes eight essential rights, so people with obesity will be screened, diagnosed, counseled, and treated according to medical guidelines and no longer face widespread weight bias and ageism within the health care system or exclusionary coverage policies by insurers and government agencies.